Indonesian Prehistoric Times, Population Movement and Spread of Settlements - indephedia.com

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Indonesian Prehistoric Times, Population Movement and Spread of Settlements



INDEPHEDIA.com - Geologically, the area in Indonesia is a meeting between three major continental plates, namely the Eurasian Plate, Indo-Australia and the Pacific. The Indonesian archipelago as it is today is thought to have formed during the melting of ice after the end of the Ice Age, around more than 10,000 years ago. During the Pleistocene, when it was still connected with Mainland Asia, the first settlers entered.

One of the earliest evidence of Indonesian inhabitants was the discovery of Homo erectus fossils of Javanese humans from the period of 2 million to 500,000 years ago. The discovery of the remains of "Flores man" (Homo floresiensis) in Liang Bua, Flores, opens up the possibility of the survival of H. erectus until the last Ice Age.

It is estimated, Homo sapiens first entered the archipelago since 100,000 years ago passing the Asian coast line from West Asia. In about 60 000 to 70 000 years ago they had reached the islands of Papua and Australia with dark skin type and tight curly hair, becoming the ancestors of the indigenous Melanesians (including Papua) now and carrying oval ax culture (Paleolitikum).

The wave of Austronesian-speaking migrants with Neolithic culture came in waves since 3000 BC from South China through Formosa and the Philippines carrying a culture of square pickaxes (Dongson culture). This migration process is part of the Pacific occupation.

The arrival of the Mongoloid wave of residents tends to the west, pushing the initial population to the east or intermarry with the local population and is a physical characteristic of the people of Maluku and Nusa Tenggara. In the first century BC settlements and small kingdoms were formed, and it is possible that the influence of trust from India was due to trade relations. (SJ.IN/ENG/*)

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